Why the Paris Agreement was signed

Published on in category Nature
Why the Paris Agreement was signed The Paris Agreement, negotiated in 2015 and signed in 2016, aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and keep the global average temperature well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels of around -0.3 °C, and trying to do the best so that the temperature does not exceed the limit of increase of 1.5 °C compared to the values before the industrial revolution. Given the observed global warming trend, this is a truly ambitious plan. But why did the agreement come about at all? What were the key stimuli? Read more

Why we sort waste

Published on in category Nature
Why we sort waste Recycling was common in ancient times, where the main reason was the high price of raw materials and production itself. Later, in the pre-industrial era, for example, paper was sorted in Japan and ash was collected in Great Britain, which was used in the manufacture of bricks. But what are the reasons now? Read more

Why the British handed over Hong Kong to China

Published on in category History
Why the British handed over Hong Kong to China On July 1, 1997, Hong Kong changed its status from a British colony to a special administrative region of the People's Republic of China. The handover took place formally on the previous day with the participation of the leading representatives of the two powers, Prince Charles on the one hand and by President Jiang Zemin on the other. But why did the British hand over Hong Kong to China? What preceded this act? Read more

Why a tongue burns after eating a pineapple

Published on in category Food
Why a tongue burns after eating a pineapple The feeling of burning the tongue after eating a large amount of pineapple is caused by a plant enzyme called bromelain. It is concentrated in the pineapple at the stem, which forms the middle hard part of the fruit. However, the area around the stem is usually eaten after the hard parts have been cut off. Read more

Why do we yawn

Published on in category Health
Why do we yawn The answer to the question why we yawn is not entirely clear. One theory states that yawning oxygenates the brain, and another that it cools the brain. Recent research tends to lean towards the second variant. The brain works better and falls asleep. Read more

Why does the comet have a tail

Published on in category Physics
Why does the comet have a tail The tail of a comet is technically called a coma and is the vapor of the outer ice layer, which evaporates with heating as the comet approaches the Sun. The solar wind causes the coma to always point away from the Sun. The tail glows due to the fluorescence of these gases. Read more

Why was Jan Hus burned

Published on in category History
Why was Jan Hus burned As a reformer of the Roman Catholic Church, Jan Hus was a great critic of it. He especially criticized the moral decline of the church and preached his teachings to the general public. His role model was the English philosopher and theologian John Wycliffe. Read more

Why does the fluorescent lamp flash

Published on in category Technology
Why does the fluorescent lamp flash This question depends on how it flashes. Based on principle of its function, every fluorescent lamp flashes. Without electrical ballast twice the mains frequency, i.e. 100x per second. With the ballast then normally in tens of kHz, i.e. 10000x per second. Read more

Why the Internet was created

Published on in category Technology
Why the Internet was created The first impetus for the emergence of the Internet was the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States. Specifically the successful launch of the Soviet Sputnik 1 spacecraft in 1957. The Soviets had a certain lead in the field of technological struggle and the Americans did not want to lag behind. Read more