Why is a microwave safe

Published on in category Technology
Why is a microwave safe Some people raise concerns about microwaves safety to human health. Mostly, these are really just odd concerns about the lack of knowledge about how a microwave oven works. Although microwave ovens are still in the sights of researchers and engineers, their principle is relatively simple. So why is a microwave safe? And is it really that safe? Read more

Why 5G is a revolutionary technology

Published on in category Technology
Why 5G is a revolutionary technology In the last two years, 5G has received a fair amount of media attention from enthusiasts who write about what this technology will allow us to, from politicians who are trying to advance the interests of large companies or distance themselves from certain companies, to conspirators who create hard to believable bizarre nonsenses, such as the theory of COVID-19 disease transmission using 5G transmitters. One way or another, however, 5G opens the way to a very interesting future. What can it bring us and why is 5G revolutionary in this regard? Read more

Why the Japanese performed seppuku

Published on in category Society
Why the Japanese performed seppuku Seppuku, also known as harakiri, is the ritual suicide of the samurai code of bushido. Traditionally, this ritual was only allowed to samurai. It has been banned in Japan since 1873. But why did the samurai approach this act? Read more

Why Gibraltar belongs to the United Kingdom

Published on in category Geography
Why Gibraltar belongs to the United Kingdom Gibraltar is a tiny British territory on the very southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula, just 14.3 km from the African continent. With an area of 6.8 km2, it is as large as, for example, the city district of Prague 3. In 2020, 34,000 people lived in Gibraltar. But why does it belong to the United Kingdom? Read more

Why Puerto Rico belongs to the United States

Published on in category Geography
Why Puerto Rico belongs to the United States Puerto Rico is a Caribbean island in the Greater Antilles archipelago. Its Spanish name is Puero Rico, which means rich port. In 2019, 3,193,694 people lived on the 9,104 km2 island. The area of Puerto Rico is therefore only slightly smaller than the South Bohemian Region. But why does it belong to the United States? Read more

Why butter turns rancid

Published on in category Food
Why butter turns rancid If we leave the butter in the heat for a long time or in the fridge for a very long time, its surface will start to get a deep yellow color and the butter will start to smell very unpleasant. This is a process called rancidity. Yellowed butter is no longer suitable for consumption. But why does rancidity occur? Read more

Why do we have dreams

Published on in category Health
Why do we have dreams Everyone has dreams, whether we remember them or not. Sometimes they may be almost indistinguishable from reality, but sometimes they are so bizarre that we do not believe how our minds could have created them. But what is their purpose? Why do we have dreams? Read more

Why do eyes burn when slicing onions

Published on in category Food
Why do eyes burn when slicing onions Onions are a popular kitchen vegetable that is used almost all over the world. In addition to food preparation, it is also used in medicine for various digestive or inflammatory diseases, as well as for arteriosclerosis and high blood pressure. But why does it cause burning eyes when slicing? Read more

Why the blood is red

Published on in category Health
Why the blood is red Blood is a liquid tissue composed of blood plasma and blood elements. Its function is to distribute nutrients throughout the body and to remove waste products. It is full of various substances fulfilling various functions from defense against foreign substances, through the transfer of information and nutrients to the cessation of bleeding in case of injury. But what is behind its red color? Read more

Why the Americans used the atomic bomb

Published on in category History
Why the Americans used the atomic bomb On August 6, 1945, the Americans detonated an atomic bomb over Hiroshima. Three days later, on August 9, 1945, they did the same over the city of Nagasaki. The two events claimed between 129,000 and 226,000 lives during the first four months after the explosion. About half of the people died on the spot and many more over the years. It was the only use of these weapons of mass destruction in practice. Why did the Americans take this step, and was it necessary at all? Read more