Nature Nature


Why does a zebra have stripes

Published on in category Nature
Why does a zebra have stripes The zebra, with its white and black stripes, is a truly iconic animal. Since the 19th century, many scientific theories have emerged explaining the reason for these stripes. Some theories have been refuted, but one very notable is currently the most accepted by the scientific community. So why does a zebra have stripes? Read more

Why are the oceans polluted

Published on in category Nature
Why are the oceans polluted Oceans are large bodies of water that contain most of the earth's water. Up to 71 % of the earth's surface is made up of oceans and contains up to 90 % of the earth's biosphere. So, these are huge areas teeming with life. The oceans are absolutely crucial to our lives. Why do we treat them so indifferently and why do we destroy them? Read more

Why is a dog a man's best friend

Published on in category Nature
Why is a dog a man's best friend Everyone knows the proverb that a dog is man's best friend. On a walk through the city, it is almost impossible to overlook someone walking a dog in the Czech Republic. It is estimated that there are 1 to 2 million dogs in the Czech Republic, which is the most dogs per capita in Europe. But why does a person live in such a close relationship with a dog and why exclusively with it? Read more

Why has Germany banned nuclear power plants

Published on in category Nature
Why has Germany banned nuclear power plants On Monday, 30 May 2011, Germany issued an official declaration that it would close all its nuclear power plants by 2022, which at that time produced 23 % of Germany's total energy production. The statement came exactly two and a half months after the temporary closure of seven older nuclear power plants, following the accident at the Fukushima I power plant on 11 March 2011. Does Germany plan to close all its nuclear power plants only because of fears of a nuclear disaster in a country that is not suffering from an earthquake, tsunami, or typhoon? Read more

Why is the planting monocultures bad

Published on in category Nature
Why is the planting monocultures bad Planting monocultures is an agricultural technique that favors a single crop (or animal species) in one place to achieve higher harvesting efficiency in less time. Why, on the one hand, is it so popular and widely used and, on the other hand, discussed and rejected by conservationists? What are its pros and cons? Read more

Why is amount of insect in decline

Published on in category Nature
Why is amount of insect in decline Insects play a very important role in our ecosystem. A large part of insects is advantageous and available for pollination of plants, regulation of pests, recycling of dead plants and animals, or as animal feed. Biodiversity is closely tied to life on Earth, and its reduction can have irreversible detrimental consequences for the entire animal kingdom, including us humans. Read more

Why the Paris Agreement was signed

Published on in category Nature
Why the Paris Agreement was signed The Paris Agreement, negotiated in 2015 and signed in 2016, aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and keep the global average temperature well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels of around -0.3 °C, and trying to do the best so that the temperature does not exceed the limit of increase of 1.5 °C compared to the values before the industrial revolution. Given the observed global warming trend, this is a truly ambitious plan. But why did the agreement come about at all? What were the key stimuli? Read more

Why we sort waste

Published on in category Nature
Why we sort waste Recycling was common in ancient times, where the main reason was the high price of raw materials and production itself. Later, in the pre-industrial era, for example, paper was sorted in Japan and ash was collected in Great Britain, which was used in the manufacture of bricks. But what are the reasons now? Read more